The Truth Behind Fear Based Marketing and Modern Agricultural Practices

The other day I decided to treat myself to a large bowl of ice cream. I was feeling like it needed a little extra something, so I decided to add some chocolate syrup and whipped cream. When I looked at the can of whipped cream, I had somewhat of an epiphany when I saw a bold label that said, “No Artificial Growth Hormones.”  I stared at the label as an agriculturalist and an advocate for the industry and began to understand why there is such a distrust between consumers and producers.

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2016 Farm Program Payments . . .

Economic Tidbits 12.18.17

Nebraska crop producers received $646 million in Price Loss Coverage (PLC) and Agriculture Risk Coverage—County (ARC-CO) payments last fall for the 2016 crop year.  In total, the USDA distributed $6.9 billion in payments to participating producers under these two programs.

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Five Tips That Can Make Life Easier for Crop Insurance Claims.

Whether its rain, hail, or heavy winds, fall harvest has been rough in Nebraska. Tough weather can mean yield loss and reasons to look at whether losses are covered by your crop insurance.

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Latest Crop Production Estimates . . .

Economic Tidbits logo

This year’s Nebraska corn production is forecast to be 1 percent less than last year, and soybean production is forecast to be 1 percent more, according to the latest USDA- NASS estimates released on Thursday.  The latest estimates peg Nebraska corn production at 1.683 billion bushels and soybean production at 316.4 million bushels, a record for the state.  U.S. corn production is forecast at 14.3 billion bushels, down 6 percent from last year, while soybean production is forecast at a record 4.43 billion bushels, up 3 percent from last year.  The percentage changes in production for Nebraska crops are shown in Table 1.
Table 1. Percentage Change in Crop Production, 2016 to 2017

 Corn  -1 %
 Soybeans  +1 %
 Sorghum  – 19 %
 Dry Edible Beans  +49 %
 Sugar beets  +1 %
 Sunflowers  – 4 %
 Alfalfa Hay  + 4 %

Corn and soybeans together typically account for 90 percent of Nebraska’s total crop cash receipts.  As such, changes in revenues for these commodities, along with changes in beef sector revenue, will dictate the overall health of the state’s agricultural economy.  Calculations using the latest USDA production and price estimates suggest cash receipts received by corn and soybean producers could be less for this year’s crop.  Combined receipts for the two crops are estimated to decrease $389 million, or 4.48 percent from last year.  Revenue for the 2017 corn crop is estimated to be $325 million less, or 5.69 percent; revenue for the 2017 soybean crop will be $64 million less, or 2.16 percent less. The reduction in revenue would result in an estimated 0.61 percent reduction in net farm income, or $30.7 million, assuming corn and soybean receipts as a percentage of net farm income is the same as the average from 2008 to 2015.  The decline doesn’t necessarily mean total net farm income for the state will be down, as the beef feedlot sector has enjoyed positive returns for awhile this year.  But any positive returns in the beef industry or other commodity sectors must overcome the declines in corn and soybeans revenues to result in an uptick in income for the state.


Jay RempeJay Rempe is the senior economist for Nebraska Farm Bureau. Rempe’s background in agricultural economics, years of experience in advocating at the state capitol, and firm grasp of issues allow him to quantify the fiscal impact of a regulatory proposal, and provide in-depth examination of key issues affecting Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers.

Nebraska County Export Values . . .


Economic Tidbits logoInternational trade and foreign markets are critical to Nebraska agriculture.  To get a sense of which Nebraska counties are most reliant on international trade, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture has created a map showing export values by county for select commodities (see below).  Commodities included are beef and beef products, corn, dairy products, distillers grains, ethanol, pork and pork products, pulses, sorghum, soybeans and soybean products and wheat.  The map was created using 2015 Nebraska cash receipts data and attributing shares to counties based on county production data.  Platte County topped the state with export values of $245 million.  Custer, Holt, Boone and Cuming Counties fall in the next tier with export values between $125-$150 million.  Most counties in Nebraska generate at least $25 million in export values, which no doubt contributes significantly to their local economies.

The top counties stand to gain the most from increased access to foreign markets.  Free trade agreements with Mexico, Canada, Korea, Colombia and others, while benefitting all counties, have been particularly beneficial to these counties.  An analysis last year of the benefits of the TransPacific Partnership (TPP) by Nebraska Farm Bureau showed many of these same counties would have benefited from the $378 million in increased receipts Nebraska was projected to receive under the agreement.  The map clearly demonstrates it is in the interest of Nebraska agriculture to continue to press for more open international markets in agricultural products.
county exports


Jay Rempe is the senior economist for Nebraska Farm Bureau. Rempe’s background in agricultural economics, years of experience in advocating at the state capitol, and firm grasp of issues allow him to quantify the fiscal impact of a regulatory proposal, and provide in-depth examination of key issues affecting Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers.

Jalapeño Popper Grilled Corn Salad

Jalapeño Popper Grilled Corn SaladIngredients

  • 8 Ears of Corn (olive oil, salt, pepper)
  • 2 Jalapeños – seeds & stems removed, finely chopped
  • 1 Cup Chopped Cooked Bacon
  • 2 ounces Cream Cheese – softened
  • 1/4 Cup Sour Cream
  • 1 Cup Grated Cheddar Cheese
  • Salt/Pepper To Taste


  1. Preheat grill.
  2. Coat each ear of corn with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
  3. Place the ears on the grill and cover. Grill 15-20 minutes, rotating every 2-3 minutes.  Remove from the grill and allow to cool for 10 minutes.
  4. When the ears are cool enough to handle, cut the kernels off into a large bowl. Eight ears should yield about 6 cups of corn.
  5. In a small bowl, combine the cream cheese with the sour cream. When blended, stir the creamy mixture into the corn.
  6. Add the chopped jalapenos, bacon pieces, and cheese. Stir to combine.
  7. Serve immediately or chill and serve later.


Yield:  about 8 cups of salad

Sam’s Shepard’s Pie

Looking for a fun, easy recipe to fulfill your week? This recipe by Crew Member, Sam Steward, is a quick and delicious version of Shepard’s Pie. Try it tonight!

Shepards Pie - cropped


1 pound of hamburger

1 can of corn

1 can of cream of celery

3 cups of cheese

1 ½ cups onion

3 large potatoes

½ a stick of butter



  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees and grease an 8×13 pan.
  2. Start by peeling and quarter the potatoes in a medium sized pot and boil until tender.
  3. While the potatoes are boiling, begin chopping 1 ½ cup of onion. Then in a medium sauce pan, melt ¼ stick of butter and start cooking the chopped onion until tender.
  4. Halfway through cooking the onions, add the can of corn and continue cooking until tender.
  5. Once the onion and corn are cooked until tender, add the 1 pound of hamburger and cook until brown.
  6. Salt and pepper the corn, onion and hamburger mixture to taste.
  7. Add the can of cream of celery to the corn, onion, and hamburger mixture.
  8. Once potatoes are cooked, you can start mashing them.
  9. In the greased, 8×13 pan, layer the hamburger mixture on the bottom. Then you can layer the mashed potatoes over top the hamburger mixture.
  10. Sprinkle the three cups of cheese over top and cover with foil.
  11. Place in oven and bake on 400 degrees for 45 minutes.
  12. To get browning of the cheese, broil for 5 minutes.