Oh, My Gourd! What You Need to Know About Gourds and Pumpkins

Pg 10 - Pumpkin varieties

Summer officially transitions into fall when you see people requesting their favorite things about the fall season, pumpkin spice lattes, comfort foods, and holiday cookies. At The Country Pumpkin, a produce store near Sutton, the spotlight is on gourds, squash and pumpkins. Continue reading

The Many Uses of Corn

It’s fall in Nebraska, and that means a lot of fun for Nebraskans! Between Halloween, Vala’s Pumpkin Patch, leaves changing, and cool nights by a campfire, Nebraska is a pretty great place to be! But even more exciting is, you guessed it, Husker football games! It is quite a site to see Memorial Stadium packed to the brim with Nebraskans decked out in red shouting “Go Cornhuskers!”. Wait a second, what is a cornhusker? A cornhusker is a person or device that removes the husks from corn. Why are we called the Cornhuskers? Nebraska is one of the top corn producing states ranking third under Illinois and Iowa. Continue reading

Meet the 2018-2019 Class of The Crew!

IMG_4183

Nebraska Farm Bureau has identified sixteen social media savvy student members to join our Crew. The Crew is a group of Nebraska Farm Bureau student members who share their love of agriculture through social media. Each member is selected in the spring and participates for one year. A Crew member:

  • Supports and amplifies Nebraska Farm Bureau and Foundation messages.
  • Creates original content to portray accurate agriculture messages.
  • Participates in facilitated learning sessions from industry professionals.
  • Leads social media advocacy for their generation.

Follow along this year as these students bring to life rural America through their work on social media!

Continue reading

Nebraska Crop Values . . .

Economic Tidbits 12.18.17

The value of Nebraska’s 2017 corn crop is $5.55 billion and the soybean crop is $2.95 billion according to recent USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA-NASS) estimates.  The corn production value is third-highest in the nation, falling behind Iowa at $9 billion and Illinois at $7.7 billion, and the soybean crop value is the fifth-largest.  The figure below shows the values of Nebraska’s corn and soybean crops since 2010.  The 2017 corn crop value is lower compared to 2016, but the soybean crop value is slightly higher.  The corn crop value exceeded $9 billion in 2011, but has since fallen to where it has been around $6 billion or less in recent years.  On the other hand, the value of the soybean crop has consistently hovered around $3 billion through the years.  The drop in corn prices and acres in production are both reflected in the lower crop values for corn.  Soybean prices have also come down, but increases in acres and higher yields have mitigated the effects on overall crop value.    Continue reading

Beyond the Beef: The Many Uses of Cattle

beef byproducts

When you think of cattle what do you think of? Most might say something along the lines of steak or hamburger, but have you ever thought about the everyday products that may use some other less obvious parts of the beef animal? By-products are secondary items that are produced in addition to the main product. For as long as humans have used animals as a food source, their by-products have been just as important. For cattle-the obvious main product is meat, but cattle provide numerous byproducts that we use daily. Through manufacturing processes, parts of the animals such as the hide, bones, hair, and fatty acids can be made into important industrial, household and health products. In fact, 99% of the beef animal is utilized!

Continue reading

Latest Crop Production Estimates . . .

Economic Tidbits logo

This year’s Nebraska corn production is forecast to be 1 percent less than last year, and soybean production is forecast to be 1 percent more, according to the latest USDA- NASS estimates released on Thursday.  The latest estimates peg Nebraska corn production at 1.683 billion bushels and soybean production at 316.4 million bushels, a record for the state.  U.S. corn production is forecast at 14.3 billion bushels, down 6 percent from last year, while soybean production is forecast at a record 4.43 billion bushels, up 3 percent from last year.  The percentage changes in production for Nebraska crops are shown in Table 1.
Table 1. Percentage Change in Crop Production, 2016 to 2017

 Corn  -1 %
 Soybeans  +1 %
 Sorghum  – 19 %
 Dry Edible Beans  +49 %
 Sugar beets  +1 %
 Sunflowers  – 4 %
 Alfalfa Hay  + 4 %

Corn and soybeans together typically account for 90 percent of Nebraska’s total crop cash receipts.  As such, changes in revenues for these commodities, along with changes in beef sector revenue, will dictate the overall health of the state’s agricultural economy.  Calculations using the latest USDA production and price estimates suggest cash receipts received by corn and soybean producers could be less for this year’s crop.  Combined receipts for the two crops are estimated to decrease $389 million, or 4.48 percent from last year.  Revenue for the 2017 corn crop is estimated to be $325 million less, or 5.69 percent; revenue for the 2017 soybean crop will be $64 million less, or 2.16 percent less. The reduction in revenue would result in an estimated 0.61 percent reduction in net farm income, or $30.7 million, assuming corn and soybean receipts as a percentage of net farm income is the same as the average from 2008 to 2015.  The decline doesn’t necessarily mean total net farm income for the state will be down, as the beef feedlot sector has enjoyed positive returns for awhile this year.  But any positive returns in the beef industry or other commodity sectors must overcome the declines in corn and soybeans revenues to result in an uptick in income for the state.

 

Jay RempeJay Rempe is the senior economist for Nebraska Farm Bureau. Rempe’s background in agricultural economics, years of experience in advocating at the state capitol, and firm grasp of issues allow him to quantify the fiscal impact of a regulatory proposal, and provide in-depth examination of key issues affecting Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers.

Why Agriculture: An Open Letter from a High School Senior

kelli blog 2 photoHere I am, a high school senior, taking part in my final days of this stage in my life. Right now, as we approach graduation, filling out scholarships is a big task. The question “What’s your intended major?” arises quite often followed by “Why have you chosen the major stated above?” I always answer with, “Agricultural Communications” and then proceed with my reason why: “I grew up in this industry…I want to make a difference within agriculture…my passion lies here.” Although each of these statements is correct, my reasoning for why I am choosing a major in agriculture goes much deeper. It wasn’t until filling out a scholarship application today that I realized that. So, here’s a letter to agriculturalists in my community, state, and nation explaining why I choose agriculture. Here’s a deeper reason for why I’m choosing this major.

kelli blog 2 photo 2Dear dedicated agriculturalists,

It’s because of you. You are the reason I write “Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Communication” on every scholarship application. You are the reason I toured the college of agriculture on East Campus at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. You are the reason I met with academic advisors in agriculture areas. You are the reason I choose agriculture. Why? It’s simple. YOU give me hope. You’ve helped me see the importance of each and every agriculturalist. From farmers to bankers to chemists to advocates- they’re all important. It’s because of you and your dedication and drive that I am choosing agriculture. Yes, I’m selecting this major for other reasons as well. For the uninformed, those disconnected from agriculture, and the curious. But in the end, I’m venturing with this major because of you. I see the smile you get when you finish your last field of corn. I see the difference you’re making in informing others through social media, radio, and magazines. I see your passion ignite when you get to visit with agriculturalists as well as non-agriculturists. I see the fear in your eyes of being able to feed the world by 2050. But I also see hope. I see so much hope. So, with that being said, thank you. Thank you for showing me that a major and a career in agriculture will be a choice I will never regret. Thank you for investing in me. Thank you for investing in others. YOU make a difference in the lives of countless people without even knowing it. So, thank you.

Sincerely,

A high school senior that got her passion for agriculture by watching all of you

kelli-mashino-info-bar